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International Crime Victims Surveys - ICVS - 1989, 1992, 1996, 2000, 2005

Cite as:

Drs. J.N. van Kesteren; Tilburg University - International Victimology Institute; (): International Crime Victims Surveys - ICVS - 1989, 1992, 1996, 2000, 2005. DANS. https://doi.org/10.17026/dans-xnj-rmb2

1989, 1992, 1996, 2000, 2005 Drs. J.N. van Kesteren; Tilburg University - International Victimology Institute; 10.17026/dans-xnj-rmb2

Integrated Database from the International Crime Victims Survey - ICVS 1989-2005, and the European Survey on Crime and Safety - EU ICS 2005. The ICVS is a programme of standardised sample surveys to look at householders’ experience with crime, policing, crime prevention and feelings of unsafety in a large number of countries.
The ICVS became operational in 1989. The main object was to seek advancement in international comparative criminological research, beyond the constraints of officially recorded crime data. The next sweeps of the ICVS surveys took place in 1992, 1996 and 2000. With its fifth sweep in 2005 the initiative has developed into a truly unique global project. Over a time span of fifteen years more than 300,000 people were interviewed about their experiences with victimisation and related subjects in 78 different countries. The ICVS is the most comprehensive instrument developed yet to monitor and study volume crimes, perception of crime and attitudes towards the criminal justice system in a comparative, international perspective. The data are from surveys amongst the general public and therefore not influenced by political or ideological agendas of governments of individual countries. Standardisation of questionnaires used and other aspects of data collection assure that data can, within confidence margins, be reliably compared across countries.

The ICVS-2 (2010) is the responsibility of the Dutch WODC (Ministry of Justice) and the British Home Office. The 2010 data (a pilot held in 6 countries) will probably become available in 2012.