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Terror Management in a Multicultural Society

Cite as:

Tjew-A-Sin, drs M.T. (Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam) (): Terror Management in a Multicultural Society. DANS. https://doi.org/10.17026/dans-24m-uj9r

2014-12-22 Tjew-A-Sin, drs M.T. (Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam) 10.17026/dans-24m-uj9r

These two datasets formed the basis of the article: Tjew-A-Sin, M., & Koole, S. (2018). Terror Management in a Multicultural Society: Effects of Mortality Salience on Attitudes to Multiculturalism are Moderated by National Identification and Self-Esteem Among Native Dutch People. Frontiers in Psychology, 9, 721.

Abstract:Terror Management Theory (TMT; Greenberg et al., 1997) proposes that mortality concerns may lead people to reject other cultures than their own. Although highly relevant to multiculturalism, TMT has been rarely tested in a European multicultural society. To fill this void, two studies examined the effects of mortality salience (MS) among native Dutch people with varying levels of national identification and self-esteem. Consistent with TMT, MS led to less favorable attitudes about Muslims and multiculturalism among participants with high (rather than low) national identification and low (rather than high) self-esteem (Study 1). Likewise, MS led participants with high national identification and low self-esteem to increase their support of Sinterklaas, a traditional Dutch festivity with purported racist elements (Study 2). Together, these findings indicate that existential concerns may fuel resistance against multiculturalism, especially among people with low self-esteem who strongly identify with their nationality.

These data are referenced by:
Data from Paper ‘Terror Management in a Multicultural Society: Effects of Mortality Salience on Attitudes to Multiculturalism Are Moderated by National Identification and Self-Esteem Among Native Dutch People’ Journal of Open Psychology Data (under review)

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